Megadeth Press Articles


So Far, So Good... So Mega! :: Marty Friedman's Stepping Stone :: Clash of the Titans - Mighty Megadeth :: I'm a Rock Star, OK? :: The Big Four :: Rust Never Sleeps :: Good Times, Bad Times, Dave Times :: Clash of the Titans :: The Secrets of Hangar 18 :: Simply Symphonic :: Deth Metal! :: Love it to 'Deth! :: A Kinder, Gentler... Megadeth :: RIP Reader's Poll Winner - Best Album: Countdown to Extinction :: I Was Dead and They Brought Me Back! :: Godzilla vs. Megadeth :: Tour of Consequences :: Mustaine Mouths Off :: MD.45 - The Mustaine Side Project :: There's a Lot of Fire on This Album! :: Dethspotting :: Megadeth: Secret Mission :: At the Start It Was About Revenge :: Escaping Capitol Punishment to Reach Sanctuary :: Megadeth's Really Over!

Megadeth: Secret Mission

taken from Hit Parader, September 1997
by Eddie Collier


It's never been particularly easy being Dave Mustaine. Over the past 15 years, few musical careers - and personal lives - have gone through more ups and downs, endured more highs and lows and waded through more epic victories than those of Megadeth's main man. From that fateful day in 1982 when he split with his original band, Metallica (for a variety of still-somewhat-mysterious reasons), through his well-documented, late 80's battles with a variety of personal demons, Mustaine's existence has been the stuff of Grade A afternoon soap operas. Despite a near-continual run of platinum album successes and sold-out world tours that have come Megadeth's way, over the years Mustaine has been hailed as everything from a deeply troubled soul, to a fascinating, complex, often brilliant guy who needed to overcome his varied problems not only to succeed... but to survive.

Thankfully, these days have apparently taken a markedly better turn in the world of Mustaine and Megadeth. After years of inner-band turmoil, where the group's lineup would seemingly change with the regularity of the seasons, Mustaine has managed to maintain a set roster for the better part of the last seven years. In addition, now long clean and sober, Mustaine has transformed into one of heavy metal's most vital and respected forces, a guy whose previous accomplishments are now lauded by a new generation of rockers, many of whom grew up under the wing of Megadeth's heavy-handed influence. While the style of pedal-to-the-metal rock that Mustaine favors has apparently fallen out of favor - at least temporarily - it appears that the release of Megadeth's long awaited new disc, Cryptic Writings, their first album in nearly three years, Mustaine is really to wage a single-handed war - if necessary - to cary the metal form back from the precipice of disaster to its former position of international dominance.

"I'm not here to be a savior of any sort," Mustaine said. "All I've ever wanted to do is play music and hope that people respond to it. I don't really feel that Megadeth was ever part of some trend or style. We've always prided ourselves in kind of standing on our own. We're not the ones who jumped on any musical bandwagon, whether it was a heavy metal bandwagon or not. Other people have tried to place us there. I don't think we ever really belonged. We've always tried to do something that was a little different - and I think we succeeded."

Indeed, it has always been virtually impossible to dismiss the riff-laden work of Megadeth as merely another vapid effort by either a mousse-abusing "hair band" or a demonically possessed death metal unit. On such previous discs as Killing Is My Business... And Business Is Good!, Rust in Peace and Countdown to Extinction Mustaine and band (now featuring guitarist Marty Friedman, drummer Nick Menza and ever-loyal bassist Dave Ellefson) created an intense, insightful and intriguing musical blend that stood out from the metal rabble like a beacon of light in the darkness. Perhaps only the mighty Metallica itself stood shoulder-to-shoulder along-side Megadeth in the fight to carry the metal empire to previously uncharted horizons - frontiers where musical competence and lyrical insightfulness were just as important as pure, heavy-duty volume in communicating that group's musical message.

Today, with Cryptic Writings, serving to reintroduce Megadeth to a generation that perhaps was too young - or just too cool - to remember the band's halcyon days in the mid '80s, Mustaine feels confident that there are still plenty of new musical horizons left to conquer. Following the demise of the "grunge assault," "punk renaissance" and "alternative revolution" that have each recently attempted to shake the music world from its somnambulistic state, he knows that Megadeth's no-holds-barred rock and roll remains as potentially combustible as ever. Mustaine feels secure in the knowledge that heavy metal as he knows and loves it is still as viable a means of communicating the unique musical verbiage of rock and roll as ever before. While he realized that there are now some previously unforeseen hurdles for a band such as Megadeth to overcome, Mustaine seems confident that both he and his band are ready for any challenge that maybe be placed before them.

"Rock and roll is something that can evolve and change, but at its heart it's still about good playing, good songs, and good attitude," he said. "I'm kind of glad that some of the other styles of music have come along over the last few years. Rock and roll reached a point in the early '90s where is was really going nowhere. It needed a big change. Since then, things have been running wild, waiting for something to come along and grab hold of everyone's interest again."

On their latest collection, Megadeth may well have created the idea disc to appeal to the widely-divergent demographic base that now comprises the hard rock universe. Sure, the raw power that has long been the band's trademark is still there in abundance, especially on such songs as "The Disintegrators" and "I'll Get Even". But, at the same time, new and exciting elements of Megadeth's musical attack are also present, running the gamut from the instrumental complexity of "Almost Honest" to the straight-ahead aggression to be found within "FFF". While some cynics may scoff at the very notion that a band with Megadeth's metallic reputation may fit smoothly into the avant-garde rock world of the late '90s, the fact is that Mustaine's undeniable talent and his unmatched creative vision have now supplied this unique group with the ideal forum through which to expand their support base. If the ever-fickel fock public decides to again embrace the strident sounds of heavy rock, then it seems a safe bet that Dave Mustaine and Megadeth will help lead that charge back up the metal mountain.

"You should never discount someone like Mustaine," a spokesman at Megadeth's record label stated. "The guy is one of the most clever performers around. He's come up with an album that's absolutely brilliant. If anyone dismisses him or his band as being 'metal', then they're really missing the boat. You can't classify what they're doing so simply. Yeah, it's heavy, but there's so much more depth to it. I know I may be a little prejudiced, but the fact is that this is really great stuff."


So Far, So Good... So Mega! :: Marty Friedman's Stepping Stone :: Clash of the Titans - Mighty Megadeth :: I'm a Rock Star, OK? :: The Big Four :: Rust Never Sleeps :: Good Times, Bad Times, Dave Times :: Clash of the Titans :: The Secrets of Hangar 18 :: Simply Symphonic :: Deth Metal! :: Love it to 'Deth! :: A Kinder, Gentler... Megadeth :: RIP Reader's Poll Winner - Best Album: Countdown to Extinction :: I Was Dead and They Brought Me Back! :: Godzilla vs. Megadeth :: Tour of Consequences :: Mustaine Mouths Off :: MD.45 - The Mustaine Side Project :: There's a Lot of Fire on This Album! :: Dethspotting :: Megadeth: Secret Mission :: At the Start It Was About Revenge :: Escaping Capitol Punishment to Reach Sanctuary :: Megadeth's Really Over!

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